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't think we will hear a lot about foreign policy tonight. we will hear about the president trying to pull troops out of afghanistan. and we will probably hear about north korea, since that happened today. that might change things a little. i think there will be a good number of things that he will not mention, which is interesting. guest: i have never observed a pattern of wars beginning in conjunction with state of the union addresses. one thing i will watch for this evening is the congressional black caucus. a collection of black members of congress met recently with valerie jarrett on the hill -- she's one of the president's top advisers -- to discuss the state of the union to some extent. the question i have is whether he is going to address black unemployment specifically and things that will help bring that number down. i think that is what the congressional black caucus wants, but i don't know if that is what he's going to do. host: we're talking with anita kumar and jonathan strong. anita kumar is a white house correspondent from mcclatchy newspapers. host: congressional reporter
emergency to deal with this threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. we are in the process of winding down the sanctions in response to developments in libya, including the fall of gaddafi and his government and the establishment of the democratically elected government. we are working closely with the new libyan government and with the international community to effectively and appropriately ease restrictions on sanctions, entities, including by taking actions consistent with the u.n. secretary council's decision to lift sanctions against the central bank of libya and to other entities on december 16, 2011. the situation in libya, however, continues to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states, and we need to protect against this threat and a diversion of assets were abused by certain members of gaddafi's family and other former regime officials. therefore, i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency with respect to libya. signed barack obama, the white house, f
't know. idon't develop the programs, don't develop policy, i don't do foreign policy or military policy or military objectives. once congress and the executive branch decide what the policy or program is, then we see how well it's done and if there are problems, we make recommendations. going back to the taxation issue, it's a critical issue. now the afghan government, what they collect is about $2 billion per year. just paying for the afghan national security force is over $4 billion. then and all the other programs. the problem is there's a delta between what the afghans collect and it cost of running their government, the cost of fighting the taliban, the cost of maintaining order. that difference is being supported by the united states taxpayer and by our allies. but it is conditioned. the caller and others have some concerns about how well that is being spent. that is the value. a lot of discussion came out of the tokyo accords about the international community will not walk, but they're trying to put conditions on the ability of the afghan government to govern and to fight corrupt
" focusing on foreign policies issues ahead on capitol hill. host: and now on your screen is representative elliot engel, democrat of new york and in the 113th congress the ranking member, the top democrat on the foreign affairs committee. representative engel, as always, we appreciate you being on the "washington journal." from that perch in the foreign affairs committee, what's your -- what are some of your issues this year that you'd like to confront? guest: well, obviously the president spoke at the state of the union the other night, talked about winding down the war in afghanistan finally and removing american troops. when the troops are actually all removed, still negotiations between us and the afghanis about what american presence will be afterwards. but that's, i think, something that the american people are tired of and happy to see winding down. we also, of course, have the volatile middle east, where we have the arab spring and egypt and syria, of course, in the throes of a civil war. assad brutally killing his own people. clearly he's going to go. the question is who comes in
need to be calm and collected a lonely job of the strategy to have a genuine common foreign -- when we draw up the strategy to have a genuine common for policy. it is time to put an end to splitting up our resources and bring them together. there are conflicts which undermine confidence in humanity. it stopped nuclear proliferation to put forward negotiations. the time has come for that as well. it needs to be present. " europe has a role to play when it comes to be clients. we cannot act alone. your knees to set an example when it comes to energy of -- europe me to set an example when it comes to energy efficiencies. i believe europe is useful and good not just for europeans before the whole planet. the best way for europe to protect its own it interest is to protect its values are of the world. we need to come back to what the project is all about. it is a political project based on values and the knowledge, ideas, works of art, culture comic creativity. it is constantly reminding ourselves that we can be able to be up to the level of our past and maybe help on new generations to com
policy that confronts climate change and reduces our reliance on foreign oil. we need that urgency to formulate a transportation plan so that states can address their crumbling infrastructure. and local businesses can get back to work. we need that urgency of now to reconfigure our security policy. make sensible cuts and fashion a force that prepares us for conflicts of the future and not the past. we need the urgency of now to make sensible changes to social security and medicare to ensure the vitality of these programs for generations to come. batered -- it will reward us with a more sensible energy policy, good roads, and a sustainable social welfare system. we will be rewarded with the stable economy and reduced market volatility. we cannot wait to act. we are borrowing 42 cents for every dollar we spend. we have to take sensible steps to begin reducing our debt without stepping on a fragile economic recovery. rehave to take steps that are big, bold, and bipartisan. that's why i signed on to the cooper-latourette bipartisan budget agreement that would have saved $4 thrill over
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6